On Perception

I hoped that the volume of people pinging me after Chris discussed his rates would die down, but since it didn’t, I thought I’d quickly answer the questions. While I’m at it, I thought I’d talk a bit about perception and worth. Enjoy.

Justin Kownacki’s post, referenced in the video, can be found here (and seriously, if Justin isn’t on your daily read list, you are missing out).

Douglas Rushkoff‘s book Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take It Back
can be purchased here (affiliate link).

And last but not least, a link to the Pick My Brain experiment, for those to pressed for time (or lazy) to scroll down.

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*the legal beagle yelled at me for not inserting something about “rates may change” in future. (I mean, duh, right?) So, there ya go, to make the legals happy.

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  • Brav-o Leslie. Thanks for your insight, and your reference to Justin's well-tempered response. This little brouha is prompting me to evaluate the value of my services on a quicker schedule then I had planned.

  • Justin is a guy with his head on straight, that's for sure 🙂

  • I know some people who think my head is anywhere *but* on straight, but I appreciate the compliment.

    You nail the core of the problem: if you're upset about what someone else is earning, your frustration lies not with that person but with yourself. I might think paying baseball players a million dollars a year is ludicrous, but if that's what the market will bear, I can't begrudge them their income.

    Yet if someone in social media is earning exponentially more than I am, the fault lies not with them for charging (and earning) that much, but with me for not producing a body of work that triggers the same trusted investment from clients.

    This isn't about “what can I do to start charging $22K a day?” It's about “what am I offering, what am I delivering, and what *is* that worth, both to a client and to myself?”

    We live in a world where Ticketmaster charges you a $5 service fee just for clicking a button, yet we freelancers feel guilty for charging reasonable rates for our own actual services. Let's stop believing that corporations have a right to price gouge while we have an obligation to starve. The truth is somewhere in the middle, and it involves living comfortably.

  • I know some people who think my head is anywhere *but* on straight, but I appreciate the compliment.

    You nail the core of the problem: if you're upset about what someone else is earning, your frustration lies not with that person but with yourself. I might think paying baseball players a million dollars a year is ludicrous, but if that's what the market will bear, I can't begrudge them their income.

    Yet if someone in social media is earning exponentially more than I am, the fault lies not with them for charging (and earning) that much, but with me for not producing a body of work that triggers the same trusted investment from clients.

    This isn't about “what can I do to start charging $22K a day?” It's about “what am I offering, what am I delivering, and what *is* that worth, both to a client and to myself?”

    We live in a world where Ticketmaster charges you a $5 service fee just for clicking a button, yet we freelancers feel guilty for charging reasonable rates for our own actual services. Let's stop believing that corporations have a right to price gouge while we have an obligation to starve. The truth is somewhere in the middle, and it involves living comfortably.