Posts Tagged: analytics

Social Media Metrics for Dummies: Win a Signed Copy

Starting today, you have a month to win one of 10 signed copies of my book, Social Media Metrics for Dummies, over on GoodReads.  Good luck!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Social Media Metrics for Dummies by Leslie Poston

Social Media Metrics for Dummies

by Leslie Poston

Giveaway ends July 05, 2013.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

 

If you aren’t yet a GoodReads user, sign up and connect with me on my Leslie Poston author page for Social Media Metrics for Dummies, Twitter for Dummies and other upcoming books.

Social Media Metrics for Dummies is designed to give you a great start in using metrics for your brand or business. It is appropriate for both beginners and intermediate analytics users. Have you read it? I love it when happy readers leave reviews on GoodReads and on Amazon!

Talking Social Media Metrics on Breakthrough Business Radio

Yesterday I was on Breakthrough Business Radio.

If you missed it, here is the audio:

Listen to internet radio with Breakthroughbusiness on Blog Talk Radio

Michelle Price and Leslie Poston talk about Social Media Metrics

Social Media Metrics, from Novice to Expert

This week I did a webinar with Demand Metric on tips and tricks for advancing your metrics knowledge.

The entire video is embedded below.

Thanks so much to Jerry Rackley and team for having me. You had a great group with great questions!

Overview:

Getting from Novice to Expert

Marketers that understand the value of social media are nevertheless often unsure the best approach to monitoring and measuring their social media efforts. This free webinar, presented by Leslie Poston, author of “Social Media Metrics for Dummies” will help you sift through all the information available about social media monitoring and metrics so that you can know what’s being said and measure the effectiveness of your social media efforts.

Using principles from her book, Leslie will teach attendees of this webinar:

How you can feel like your efforts online are measurable and full of purpose and direction.
How applying metrics to the whole organization for a true social business model will help you drive sales and grow your brand.
How metrics should lead to more than one goal: marketing and brand awareness, sales, competitive intelligence, human resources, content marketing plans and more.

Buy the Social Media Metrics for Dummies book here for more like this. Have a copy already? Review it here.

Wrap Post: From Dummy to Genius Metrics Webinar with Awareness

Seminar on Metrics for Awareness

View more presentations from Leslie Poston

(Having trouble viewing the slides? Try this link.)

I had the pleasure of presenting a webinar on social media metrics for a group of people* via the Awareness Inc. webinar series this week. This is the second webinar I’ve done with Awareness and I enjoy it every time. The people who sign up are always engaged and ask fantastic questions.  I know there is a recording on Awareness, and you can grab it here.

I was asked to create a list of the tools I mentioned. I only touched the tip of the iceberg with tools listed and the potential of metrics in the webinar. An hour is so short when you’re discussing such an important and comprehensive topic! (By the way, Walter Schärer attended from pretty far away and took some fairly good notes, linked here for your reference. If you also took notes, let me know and I’ll link to your post.) Regarding tools, there are many, many more tools in the book, and instruction on how to create many of the metrics we discussed (available here), but here are those tools I was able to mention this week for you:

1) For more information on the reverse tracking of the metrics of Occupy Movement sites that I mentioned to illustrate my point that metrics is a two-way street, I refer you to Tim Lebert’s post detailing his findings

2) Awareness, Inc’s Hub

3) Google Analytics

4) KISSMetrics

5) Ripples (Google Plus)

6) SocialStatistics (Google Plus)

7) Bit.ly (Twitter, etc – URL shortener with stats)

8 ) Ow.ly (Twitter, etc – URL shortener with stats)

9) HootSuite(see above)

10) TweetReach (Twitter)

11) Page Lever  (Facebook)

12) Edgerank Checker (Facebook)

13) TubeMogul (Youtube – uploader with stats – now called OneLoad)

14) PinReach (Pinterest)

15) Pintics (Pinterest)

16) Pinerly (Pinterest)

17) Pinpuff (Pinterest)

18) MailChimp (Email)

19) Constant Contact (Email)

20) WhatCounts (Email)

21) Localytics (Mobile)

22) Google Alerts (Competitive Intelligence)

23) Search Alerts for Ebay (Competitive Intelligence)

24) Advanced Twitter Search (Competitive Intelligence)

25) Slick RSS (Competitive Intelligence – any RSS reader will do, pick your favorite)

26) ChangeDetection (Competitive Intelligence)

27) HowSociable (Competitive Intelligence)

28) SocialMention (Competitive Intelligence)

29) Majestic SEO (Competitive Intelligence)

30) SEO for Chrome (Competitive Intelligence)

31) W3 Patrol (Competitive Intelligence)

32) W3 Techs (Competitive Intelligence)

33) Regular Expression Checker (Competitive Intelligence)

34) GA Data Grabber from MTAnalytics

35) Christopher Penn (Great source of actionable info)

36) Avinash Kausik (Great source of info)

37) Radian6 (Metrics + Sentiment)

38) Custom Scoop (Metrics + Sentiment)

39) Quantified Self Movement (Metrics Outside of the Box)

40) Nicholas Felton (QS Example)

41) Fitbit (the device I use to track exercise, sleep, etc)

*And by “group of people” I mean well over 1000 signed up. Thank you so much, that was an honor.

I use Creative Commons Search to find awesome, available for use images for my slide shows. Credit for the images that made this slide show more awesome go to:

Marc_Smith, Adbusters, Seattle Municipal Archives, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Search Engine People, craigCloutier, Anonymous9000, klipfolio, mtanalytics, stockerre, filmnoir 1, Nicholas Felton

Social Media Metrics for Dummies: Ready for Pre-Orders!

That’s right, the book is finally WRAPPED and ready for pre-orders!

I am very excited to see my hard work hit shelves and I hope it helps folks learn about metrics and how to implement them in their social media and on their web sites.

I’m already starting to see the book appear in mentions around the web, and I appreciate the sharing and recommendations very much.

The official short link for the book is http://bit.ly/smmfd and the official hashtag for talking about it on Google Plus and Twitter is #SMM4D – I’ll keep the link updated to the best places to buy it as we go forward.

You can’t write a book in a vacuum, and I was able to include tips, tricks and tools from many metrics heavy hitters that I’m proud to call friends. This gives you a more well-rounded view of metrics, instead of a single “my way or the highway” approach. I am so looking forward to seeing the book on shelves, and will have a publication date for you soon. The publisher assures me that there will be ebook editions for all of the major devices as well.

Metrics Snapshot Tool

Considering I’m writing Social Media Metrics for Dummies, I don’t talk about metrics often on this blog. Mainly that’s because I’m too busy helping clients figure metrics out in real life.

I did want to take a minute to mention the Social Metrics plug in for you. It’s not a tool for deep metrics analysis but it is a great tool for quick content analysis – seeing what’s working for you as a social network, as well as what’s emerging as sharable topics on your blog. For example, you can see that Digg, as a whole, is not a social network where we see a lot of shares here at M2. You can also quickly see that our readers are very interested in changing the face of education right now (as they should be).

I haven’t tried the Social Metrics Pro version yet but it gives you some nice Excel like features that the free version doesn’t. However, the free version is adequate for Magnitude’s needs right now since we have such deep analytics running elsewhere.

What’s your favorite metrics tool for your blog?

What Can My Lack of Expertise in Waffle House Tell Us About Lazy Metrics?

Image from Wall Street Journal

As many of you know, I’m writing a book about metrics for John Wiley and Sons Publishing called Social Media Metrics for Dummies. What you may not know is the struggle I’ve had trying to figure out how to address the issue of services offering incomplete metrics that become some kind of standard for folks too lazy (or, to be fair, too pressed for time) to do much deep-diving on their own. Things like Klout, for example.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I know what Klout is trying to do, I think. And they have adjusted their algorithm a number of times. My score was a 79 in the beginning (until I spent less time online, when it dropped to 72). It hovered at 69 through several more algorithm changes until it now is resting in the 56 or 57 range after the latest one. What bugs me about Klout is that it isn’t a complete metric. It doesn’t tell you anything about the person except, conceivably, how noisy they are on various services.

I’ll use myself as an example. This morning I finally “hid” a topic that Klout has dubbed me as “influential” in for two+ months now: Waffle House. I like Waffle House and all, but I don’t live near one, and I don’t go visit them when I travel. How did I get “influential” about it? Doing a little digging, it seems it began when I shared a tweet from a WSJ article several weeks ago about the Waffle House disaster plan and Waffle House trailer offices – how they handle natural disasters and get their stores open quickly with limited menus where possible to be a local source of food and comfort, and also how they use their online presence to spread the word.

By a sheer coincidence of timing, that tweet got re-tweeted a gazillion times and picked up on several Tumblr blogs*, entering the Tumblr share network. Shortly after that, it emerged as a topic I’m influential on in Klout, never having discussed it before or since. Now you tell me: is that an accurate measurement? I should be influential in a variety of things, like hockey, music, food, wine, football, mma, film, politics and other things I discuss and have deep conversations about frequently (none of which show up) or in social media, content marketing and emerging media (which do show up).

*To me, my “influence” in Waffle House was a better measurement of TUMBLR’s influence than mine. I don’t have a Tumblr blog, but those who did caused most of the impact. To not take into account deep conversation and conversions over noise indicates a failing on the part of Klout and narrow metrics like it. I’m sure they are working to address it – it’s plain they want to be the go-to metric source for measuring influence – but they have a long way to go (not to mention other problems with privacy and trust issues and some nefarious practices to solve first).

In the book, Klout gets a relatively positive mention, but with the double caveat of “use with caution” and “not intended as your sole metrics solution”. If the folks at Klout would like to have a conversation with me about this and discuss case studies or what they are working toward, I’d love to. I like to keep an open mind.

Meanwhile, if you want to put understanding your Klout on steroids, have a look at this nifty data set from always-insightful Chris Penn. It will rock your socks. Also, I’d love to hear what goofy thing Klout thinks you are influential in.

Aside: Single focus metrics options that show a more complete picture could include Smarterer, by the way. I really like where they are headed and hope they soon integrate with LinkedIn and other services. Disclosure: I wrote the bulk of their Twitter test and edited it during their private beta phase, though it’s now open to public edit.

A Little Light Reading

What’s on your nightstand or in your beach tote this summer? My summer reading looks like this:

Currently finished:

The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell (2nd reading)

Groundswell by Christine Li and Josh Bernoff (2nd reading)

The Moral Animal by Robert Wright (TERRIBLE book, btw)

On the nightstand:

Made to Stick by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Planet Google by Randall Stross

Spent: Sex, Evolution and Consumer Behavior by Geoffrey Miller

Rules of Thumb by Alan Webber

The Power of a Positive No by William Ury

On Order:


The Fourth Turning by William Strauss

The Extreme Future by James Canton

The Transparent Society by David Brin
Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey A. Moore; Regis McKenna
The Soul of a New Machine by Tracy Kidder

What is on your must read list? I have a few projects coming up that require researching and studying a variety of theories and viewpoints, and I’m actively seeking books I have not considered yet. Do you have a seminal work not listed here you rely on for future theory or psychology/sociology of technology? Does one of these works speak to you? What resonates with you?


note: links in this blog may be Amazon affiliate links


Can social media change the face of adverising to help you survive the downturn?

Can social media and social advertising help us find a way out of this economic turbulence? I think they can. I wrote about my opinion on social advertising and the new definition of ROI on Mashable today.