Posts Tagged: leslie poston

Setting strategy aside to bear witness to turbulent times

If you’ve known me throughout my career, you may be familiar with the 80/20/0 philosophy regarding social media posts that I share as a simple template for clients who want to get started in digital marketing to keep in mind:

  • 80% human posts lifting up ideas and people that have nothing to do with your work
  • 20% work related and promotional
  • 0% politics

Following my social feeds lately, you can plainly see I’ve tossed that long-time, steady practice right out for my own personal use.I’d even go so far as to say my personal ratio right now is 80% politics, 20% work, if I had to guess. I wanted to talk for a minute about why I am (temporarily, I truly hope) highly focused on politics and current events.

Without a diverse, intelligent, empathetic, knowledgeable society where we care about and lift up our fellow humans, we are all in trouble – globally. Borders only exist in the minds of humans. They are a construct. A useful construct for shaping smaller, more tribal societies around common values and economic goals, to be sure, but a construct nonetheless. Everything we do impacts the world. We share one planet. In recent weeks, political shifts in the US and the UK (but especially the US) have led to a more restricted vision of society. If these shifts stopped at economics, I would not be so vocal, however; these shifts are putting real human lives here and abroad in peril.

So I ask that if you follow me on social, bear with me. I feel it is important to share my work knowledge with you, but it will continue to be peppered with a heavy dose of bearing witness to the events unfolding. This is a monumental time in our history, and for me it would be morally wrong to turn a blind eye to it and conduct 100% “business as usual.” I say this in a truly non-partisan way, as well: no matter your political leanings, taking care of our fellow humans seems like a universal value we all must share.

Meanwhile, if you want to try the beta of my passion project with the all-woman led BuoyUp, you can download the beta now in the Chrome Store and help us do good while reading the news. Additionally, if you are an ethically focused B2B company who wants the same in your digital strategist to help you right now, reach out to me. We have room for a few more digital strategy and content marketing clients at my company Story Engage before we’re at capacity.

image credit Lucas Franco via Unsplash

Family, Friends, Apathy: Three Reasons Your Privacy is Eroding

This is a post I started in December of last year, then wandered away from for client work. There are a lot of these abandoned ideas that flounder in my drafts folder over the course of a year, and part of my December ritual is to clean them out if I deem them no longer relevant. I think this one is more relevant now than it was then, though the reason has changed. So, what did I intend to talk about? The way other people’s carelessness impacts you, and the way your own apathy compounds the error.

Since my most recent post was about leaving Facebook and already mentioned the privacy violations and user information abuses inherent in its code, let’s start with that network as our example. On Facebook, it doesn’t matter what your personal settings are for privacy. If you interact with people and brands on Facebook anywhere, in any way, your interaction is visible outside your trusted (or, in some cases, semi-trusted) network. As a user I find this infuriating, as the site design itself encourages invasive behavior and an erosion of the understanding of individual boundaries. Brands, however, love this, obviously. What is fine for you as an individual (e.g. clicking like or commenting on a stranger’s post – shown to you because a vague work acquaintance or maybe your cousin “liked” it, friending someone’s unstable family member – whom you have never met – because you think being connected tangentially on Facebook gives you permission to do so, sharing a post when it’s clearly set to “friends only” and not meant to be shared) is a violation for someone else. We wouldn’t behave that way in person, putting people’s privacy at risk (well, except photographers, but that’s a different rant), but people freely do so online. Stowe Boyd saw this challenge coming years ago when he talked about publicy vs privacy.

The only winning move is not to play

I figured out how to quit you, Facebook, and still see photos of my nieces and nephew.

First, I’m still “there,” a ghost in the machine — lurking, instead of participating. That way I can still virtually visit the friends, colleagues, and relatives who insist on swimming the algorithmic pool. I don’t trust Facebook — I haven’t for years — and it was time. In the version of this post about it on Facebook, I made a long list of “other places to find me” but you’re already here, so I’ll skip ahead to the how-to and why-the-heck part…

Deleting everything I’d ever posted took four weeks. Four. Long. Weeks.

Are you ready to be freed from a world of work?

This post originally appeared on Facebook two weeks ago, reposting here since I am deprecating Facebook.

I go on and on about needing to be ready for the world without work. Thinking about what we’ll do to find value in ourselves when we don’t have to “be” our jobs, what we’ll do to put value back in the world around us.

The responses I get indicate that people cling to the idea that this is far away.

Last month a company delivered a semi truck full of beer — in a driverless, fully automated big rig. In 48 of the 50 states, trucking is still currently listed as the best job you can get with no degree. Driverless trucks don’t fall asleep behind the wheel or have to take drugs to stay awake to pull multiple shifts.

Obsessing about the potential of the world beyond work

This week Aeon Magazine had a piece focused on my favorite topic: the world after work. Helping businesses and individuals who are struggling to cope with the change to the world beyond work is the focus of my ongoing studies, in fact, and something I incorporate into change management strategy when helping clients. I realized while reading how little I talk about this passion, so expect more from me on this.

Meanwhile, I encourage everyone to read this article by James Livingston, a professor at Rutgers. It is a great thought exercise in the ways work holds us back, and the need to find other ways to define our value and occupy our time.

“When work disappears, the genders produced by the labour market are blurred. When socially necessary labour declines, what we once called women’s work — education, healthcare, service — becomes our basic industry, not a ‘tertiary’ dimension of the measurable economy. The labour of love, caring for one another and learning how to be our brother’s keeper — socially beneficial labour — becomes not merely possible but eminently necessary, and not just within families, where affection is routinely available. No, I mean out there, in the wide, wide world.”

Speaking personally for a moment on what I believe is a related topic, I think this tense election season was a very real result of refusing to deal with this question in a realistic, non-emotional way. It’s hard to hear politicians around the world clinging to nationalistic ideas as some pacifier for the disenfranchised, underemployed, poverty stricken public when technology has already made it impossible to “bring back the jobs.”

140 Characters: Mise en Place for Content Marketing

mise en place for content marketing

“What a pain. It takes so much time to make a short tweet, and I have so much to say.” ~ every person who represents a brand online since 2006.

Hard Truth #1: No one cares about your manifesto.

Going strictly by anecdata, let’s accept as true that many people like to hear themselves talk. Why say something in 10 words when you can break out the thesaurus and say it in 4 pages? That advanced degree or extended training program isn’t going to pay for itself. In general, it makes people feel better to validate the time they spent learning by sounding smart and taking an extra hour of [someone else’s] time to reach a clarity of message and brand voice.

Hiring in the age of social media: don’t be creepy

Leslie Poston's dog Faulkner ©Leslie Poston, Not for Reuse

Leslie Poston’s dog Faulkner ©Leslie Poston, Not for Reuse

An interesting question popped up in a social media group I frequent. It’s a common question, worth sharing here:

“How much weight do you give social media in the hiring process? I am finding more and more that as I review a candidate with the needed qualifications, unfortunately their Facebook, Twitter, etc reflects a person that I don’t want representing my business. Sometimes it’s unprofessional language, sometimes it’s negative comments about their current or past employers, sometimes it’s much, much worse. So is it possible to be two entirely different people (real life vs social life) or is their resume just created to land the job?”

My answer was:

“According to the NLRB employers can not request passwords or access to employee accounts, nor can they discriminate based on social media. It falls under the same protections as not being able to ask if they are pregnant, what religion they are, etc. This is a debate that has raged online since long before social media. Looking at personal social media is tricky at best. Looking at blog posts that demonstrate expertise, however, is different. It’s a fine line.

The ethics are clear to me. Even if you are overwhelmed by how many people apply for a job these days, even if you are a nice person, even if you mean no harm, even if you hold yourself at arms length and don’t ask for access, even if it makes your job easier, even if #allthereasons: if you would not be able to easily find out in a job interview or a reference check, it’s not something you should be using to determine hire. If you aren’t finding out what kind of person the applicant is in the interview, ask better [legal] questions. :)”

That this question is still asked so often is partially a testament that our laws have not caught up with our tech, in many cases. It also shows that when they have, people simply like things that are easy.

Your content must build your own business, not someone else’s

Leslie Poston' dog Faulkner, © Leslie Poston, Not for reuse

Leslie Poston’s dog Faulkner, © Leslie Poston, Not for reuse

Mark Schaefer wrote a post advising a “liquid” content strategy, with content posted only on various rented, third party platforms and not on a site that you own. This is diametrically opposed to the hub and spoke (or “spine”) strategy I support. In the hub and spoke model, your content lives in your hub (usually a website or blog) and is shared elsewhere (third-party spokes). Imagine your entire content team spinning their wheels — and your budget — in a constant search for “woo” to accommodate this pseudo strategy. It’s not sustainable.

tweeeeeesample

This concept might work quite well for companies like Groupon, but B2B companies or companies that need to convey complex ideas will find little success scrambling after the next shiny object that has captured the public’s attention. Rather than frantically posting original content on third-party platforms first, like so many corporate lemmings, consider the fickle audiences the platforms are attempting to capture and realize that to do so is to support the quest of the platform for relevance and business longevity in the face of mutable tribes – not necessarily to support your company’s best interest.

Fear is your frenemy

Leslie Poston's dog Faulkner © Leslie Poston, Not for reuse

Leslie Poston’s dog Faulkner © Leslie Poston, Not for reuse

What did you run from today? As my puppy ran from a loud noise three stories below, I teased him for being ridiculous (my pit bull is a lover, not a fighter). It dawned on me immediately that none of us are immune to these ridiculous moments.

In my work through the years, I’ve often expected executives and business leaders to be fearless. With decades of experience and vast stores of knowledge, telling the story of your work — whatever that work is — should be effortless. Instead, those few that are fearless are met with legal teams, media teams, branding specialists, multiple editors, and accountants. By the time the intrepid few have run that gauntlet, they are often completely turned off by the effort it takes to tell their business story. Their strife echoes through a canyon of cubicles, creating an environment where the the more timid among them get the clear message that one carefully produced pre-approved message for all is “good for you”, going down like medicine.

What would happen if you chose the bold statement, the action words? Would the sky fall from your declarative sentence? I don’t mean adding a layer of buzzwords to your headlines, or linkbaiting. I mean digging deep, and releasing the barbaric yawp of your full experience. I’m not talking about a late night taxi confession, a regrettable drunk dial to your less guarded inner self. Instead, simply saying what you mean, revealing what your decisions cost you and what your successes gifted you. I mean helping those who are trying to find your work understand how they can connect with you beyond your price sheet.

Try an exercise with me. For one week, pay attention to every word you don’t say. If you want to write it down, even better. But for one week be mindful of when you are silent. Also be mindful of when you self-edit — be it on social media or in the boardroom. What did you lose in your silence; what opportunity was missed? When you self-edited, was your point softened to the point where it caused meetings to end without action, or a project to extend another week in indecision, destined to die in committee?

As you begin to see the toll self-censorship creates in your everyday life, take a look at your brand storytelling. Does it seem rote and disconnected? That means you are allowing fear to take the lead, instead of clear conviction and knowledge. I propose that what makes you afraid is exactly what should be said. Am I advocating for disclosure of corporate secrets, or mishandling of client trust? Of course not. I am advocating for clarity, purpose, brevity and as much truth as you can tell in your corporate communications. That’s the “secret” that makes people who read your words come back for more.

This post also appeared on LinkedIn and Medium today

Hummingbird Helping Long Tail and Mobile Content

Write Great ContentGoogle released the latest iteration of its algorithm, Hummingbird, in late Summer. Most people focused on the deprecation of keywords and key phrases in the report, lamenting the rise of (not provided) data as a percentage of visitors to their site. Savvy marketers know that this has been a long time coming, as Google pushes its focus to a more semantic and mobile web. In fact, even non-savvy web users have known it was coming, as Google has done an ever-better job fine tuning search results and tracking search terms. There is even a trend emerging where people use Google’s search box auto-fill showing the most popular searches to make videos about sociological changes or issues in society. How does a content marketer excel in the new age of Hummingbird? How does Hummingbird change SEO tactics?

Interest and Relevance Matters

One of the more interesting changes for marketers and SEOs is the move to encrypted search. This is the trigger that Google pulled that made blogs suddenly see (not provided) as anywhere from 60 – 90% of the analytics for their site. By doing this, Google is forcing marketers to stop using keywords as a quick metrics for proof of success to the C-suite, as well as causing them to dig deeper to show actual tie-ins between content, social, sales, leads, downloads and other actions and conversions. It’s also increasing the relevance of the “stickiness metrics”: time on site, return visits, remarketing data, device data, and conversion drop point data. By creating compelling content and improving the metrics you are tracking, the shift away from keywords will improve your content and overall site quality and your conversion rates.

Encrypted search is not new, by any means. Google has been experimenting with this in various degrees since 2010. It’s worth noting that not every user’s search data is encrypted. You’ll still be able to get light keyword data – just not the extensive keyword lists people have grown used to. There is a way to get around this (somewhat) if you are a Google Webtools and Google Analytics power user. For the work around you’ll need to create two reports in your browser, while logged in to your Google account(s), then utilize a tool like VLOOKUP or GA DataGrabber tool to glean useful information from the reports. Search Engine Watch has a great step by step with screenshots that will help you set this up.

All of these changes mean that your content is going to have to compete on quality, not quantity. Providing a wide variety of useful, interesting content in many formats will help keep you relevant. Authorship is as important as quality content now, as well, so making sure all of your blog authors have a strong, linked social presence (especially on Google) will help build that foundation. In fact, the more links to valid publications your authors have, and the longer their web history, the more it will help your search results.

Long Tail Content

Why did Google make such a sweeping change to keywords and search data? There are several reasons. Some are speculative, such as the desire to push people into using Google Plus, and some are concrete, such as the changes in the way people search. It is less and less common for people to search simple keywords or key phrases (“high heeled shoes” or “red pumps”) and much more common for people to search the same way they talk (“Where can I get red heels in New York?”). The search engine has become a “trusted friend”, especially since the rise of Siri and Google’s voice activated tools like Google Glass.

The best content creators out there can anticipate what questions their potential customers will ask, then create content that will remain relevant to answering those questions, standing the test of time. Gone are the days of the SEO content farm with robotic, shallow content. Now people are looking for deeper content, content that anticipates and answers their needs, content that entertains in a meaningful way. Content marketers need to create content that can be expanded over time, and used in a variety of platforms and media types.

Mobile Content

Hummingbird also gives more weight to mobile content. It used to be enough to make a scaled down, less feature rich version of your website for viewing on mobile phones. Now customers are more interested in a fully responsive web site that is scaled up and feature rich, that automatically recognizes their device and adapts the design accordingly without sacrificing features. Google Hummingbird is designed to encourage that behavior, giving sites with a combination of great content and a great mobile site precedence over sites that falter in mobile.

Mobile site access is also a great reason to offer balanced content for a variety of audiences. Longer, more in depth pieces are essential for both SERPs and thought leadership, however; shorter content designed with mobile readers in mind is ideal for added mobile reach. Interest pieces and visual content are fantastic for addressing the needs of your mobile readership.

SEO

SEO as we knew it is effectively over, thanks to Hummingbird. There are some tried and true tactics that will stay in place, but this is the first big push away from SEO and into more semantic web results that include not just keywords, but sentiment and grammatical patterns, as well as a push to be mobile friendly.

In fact, you can achieve two goals – getting more people to your content via mobile devices and increasing your mobile SEO – simply by combining short and long form content. By creating image-based, easily consumable short form content as a mobile gateway to your longer, more in depth pieces you can increase conversion from click to engagement on mobile, and increase the traction of your site content.

Google Hummingbird is a dramatic change, but not a fatal one. The smart, agile company that is focused on a multi-faceted content strategy including deep content, snackable content, visual content and mobile will succeed in this new SEO landscape.

(Einstein image made with the fun Einstein Image Generator)