Posts in Category: Blog

The Next Generation of CRM: Social Media Today Webinar

This week, wearing my author hat for Social Media Metrics for Dummies and my strategy hat from M2, I had the pleasure of joining Mike Lewis, author of Stand Out Social Marketing: How to Rise Above the Noise, Differentiate Your Brand, and Build an Outstanding Online Presence and VP of Sales and Marketing for Awareness; Paul Gillin, author of Social Marketing to the Business Customer and B2B marketing coach; Taulbee Jackson, Chief Strategist at Raidius; and the folks at Social Media Today for a webinar on The Next Generation of CRM.

It was an information packed hour moderated by the capable and well-informed Brent Leary where we covered all that’s new and worth noting in CRM, made a few predictions, had some witty banter and generally enjoyed talking shop and doing our best to be helpful for everyone tuned in.

If you missed it, you can download or listen to the audio with Leslie Poston, Paul Gillin, Mike Lewis, Taulbee Jackson, Brent Leary, Robin Carey for Next Generation of CRM by Social Media Today and see the simple slide deck below in this post.

A bit of the Twitter conversation during the webinar:

 

 

 

 

Read on for more event tweets and quotes and the full official webinar wrap description from the Social Media today wrap post:

 

The Social Web has removed a lot of the stability, structure and control that once characterized CRM. Traditional CRM has featured elements of communication and feedback tracking, but they have always relied on structured tools for participation and recording actions and outcomes. Now, customer relations exist across a wide assortment of platforms and conversations where the business must radically adapt if it is to practice any kind of management. In this webinar, our panelists will assess the new CRM – its potential and its limits in the context of a customer-defined playing field. Tune in and bring your questions as we explore the following issues:

Where does CRM live in a socially savvy business?
What CRM tools and practices have become outmoded and how are they being replaced?
Are there any boundaries between CRM, marketing, PR and CS on the Social Web?
How has the customer’s role changed in the relationship?
About the Panel:

Mike Lewis, VP of Sales and Marketing at Awareness, Inc. and author of Stand Out Social Marketing

Leslie Poston, Founder of Magnitude Media, Speaker, author of Social Media Metrics for Dummies, Brand Journalist for Radian 6.

Paul Gillin, Trainer and B2B social media marketing coach, author of three books on social media marketing including his most recent book Social Marketing to the Business Customer.

Brent Leary, is a CRM industry analyst, advisor, author, speaker and award winning blogger. He is co-founder and Partner of CRM Essentials LLC

Taulbee Jackson, is the founder and CEO of Raidious, the company that managed the social media efforts for the 2012 Super Bowl.

 

 

 

Throwing Stones at Glass Houses, or Privacy vs Publicy

Normally I am all business on this blog, but let’s take a moment to think about a few tech issues on a personal level. I think Google Glass is cool tech – I love cool tech – but if I see someone wearing Google Glass glasses after they come out, I’m infinitely less likely to want to be anywhere near them for any type of interaction. As the glasses get better and harder to detect, I’m likely to learn people have them by experience then avoid them. I’m wondering if I’m the only one?

You see, in spite of my public job, I don’t assume that every moment, thought or deed (my own or others’) needs to be public.  I am not a fan of being photographed or having video taken without being asked first, or having photos put up I don’t get a chance to look at first, and if you have ever tagged me in a non-work related photo – well, you already know how I feel about that. I value privacy and the dwindling ability to choose how much the internet at large gets to see of my (actual) life.  Just because you *can* take a picture of someone in a public place doesn’t mean you *should*.

People ask me why Facebook is my least favorite social network. Setting aside the network’s blatant disregard for a consistent user experience, the manipulation of the user base while on site and the downright Machiavellian terms of service: the total disregard for privacy on the network, and the inconsiderate behavior it encourages in people, really make me cringe. I feel we must do our best to resist a world where we have spy glasses, drone planes, a culture of eavesdropping on communications and an “always on” mentality.

Let’s look at it from the simple perspective of crime, if you don’t like the privacy angle. As a woman, I am cautious to only pre-disclose events I plan to attend if I know my home will have someone in it and that the event will keep me surrounded by people. I don’t connect with many people on sites like Foursquare – I use them to keep me motivated for things like the gym, but never check into my home, and more often than not I keep my check ins private unless I am – you guessed it – surrounded by people and know my home is protected while I’m gone.  I value time with my friends where I can let my hair down a bit and have a little fun, and I eschew anyone who tries to make those vital moments of being out of the public eye public by sticking a camera phone or flip cam in my face.

It’s because that behavior is rude and invasive, true, but  it’s also because it’s not wise. I can’t control the privacy settings of other people – I can only control my own. A large percentage of information bleed online comes from the missed settings and carelessness of other people that you know. You can lock your own privacy settings down tight, but your inebriated friend at the reception might have his set to public, or a relative might not be as tech savvy, and enough unwarranted photos might reveal you or your kids’ favorite hangout, even if you try to keep it private, which could put you and people you know at risk.

I get a lot of flack from photographer friends about my desire to be asked before photographed. They err on the side of “if you’re in a public place, your consent is automatic”. I agree that at times that’s true. I can’t really get annoyed if I’m speaking at a conference and my picture or a video is taken, and I don’t – it’s all about context.  There is a difference between being in a “public place” and “publicy” and a need in this hyperconnected age to be vigilant and respectful about not just your own privacy but the privacy of those you come in contact with.

Mass adoption of new technology always causes a cultural shift. As one example: the dissolution of public transportation and rise of the car brought us the suburbs and contributed to urban decay in addition to making it possible to do cool things like go visit relatives in Ireland or go on vacation quickly and easily (the car and the plane brought us the world, but the trade offs for easy access to the planet have been pretty significant).

I wonder if we are prepared for – or even cognizant of – the cultural shift away from privacy that is in process right now and what it will cost us if not handled delicately and reigned in to allow for private spaces inside and out. Study after study  shows that privacy, the ability to reinvent oneself or move past a prior mistake in life (Think for a moment of Facebook’s recent indication that they will open up to ages 13 and under and what that will mean to their ability to grow from bad decisions, learn and reinvent when it’s time to move into their adult life. Pretty serious impact, isn’t it? ), the chance for quiet solitude and reflection to grow creativity and deepen thought processes, the ability to move safely from one place to another and more are vital to our well being as individuals and as a society.

*Note: the issue of trading our online behavioral and shopping data for access to sites is a whole ‘nother issue/can of worms. Post on that coming soon.

What are your thoughts on privacy vs publicy and this huge cultural shift that is going on under our noses?

Social Business vs Responsive Business

The term social business is in the air today, and there seems to be some general confusion about what the term means. As I keep seeing it used, I think people who are saying “social business” actually mean “responsive business”. I’ll try and break down what I see as the different aspects of each:

Responsive Business

This business is savvy in social networks and engagement. It’s got a channel open on every social corner, and has listening for brand mentions and customer concerns and responding quickly down pat. It is strong in brand awareness and customer service on social channels. Lead generation, thought leadership and business growth are happy side effects of a consistent social media, email and content marketing strategy supported by basic analytics and metrics analysis.

Social Business

The true social business uses social tools, metrics and methods internally and externally to be a better overall business across departments. In addition to using outward facing social media platforms and tools in expected ways: to increase sales and sales leads and bring information from networks into the process, to build brand awareness and establish thought leadership, to market to customers and potential partners, to source new employees and gather information about applicants, for competitive intelligence, for product marketing and research, informal crowdsourcing, data mining, information distribution, affiliate and referral sales and other established practices, the social business has an internally social component. The inward facing social ideal breaks down silos between departments, making internal communication fluid and complete, ensuring that the company operates more efficiently. It relays information faster and more accurately and makes all employees at all levels part of the process of a smoothly run business. It empowers people to make better decisions in the departments by connecting them to the information and people they need to access efficiently. In short, a social business uses social tools and social ideals to create a well oiled machine with agile business practices that help them grow and become competitive as markets shift and change quickly. This is a holistic shift in how business is done that is different than being on social media and responsive in that space.

What do you think? Are there differences I missed? Do you agree that the term social business as it is often used today is on its way to becoming as meaningless as the overused term “innovative” (often used when “iterative” makes more sense)?

Fun Product Placement Marketing

Walking through Target the other day, I started seeing giant “Hulk footprints” as I got closer to the back of the store.  I knew they’d lead me to the toy section, and to an Avengers merchandise display, but I followed them anyway. Why? Because it’s just as fun for grownups to Hulk-stomp their way through a store as it is for kids.

When I brought it up at dinner that night, my friends were mixed. Many have kids, so they are largely against the glitz and glamour that encourages their kids to whine and beg for yet more toys, when they don’t play with the ones they have. And don’t get them started on toys branded as collectibles – that brings up stories of the Beanie Babies craze in the 80s and 90s and how spectacularly low in value those toys are now (one person even did a stint as a Beanie Baby show bouncer – the moms and grandmas would physically fight over the toys).

The conversation segued into movie product placements, and into movies that seem entirely sponsored by one entity, regardless of if that’s true or not (think You’ve Got Mail with Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks). This group of people, none of whom are marketers, have become jaded by so much advertising being inserted directly into their lives. They miss the days when advertising and marketing seemed more apart from the tools they used, the places the visited and the media they consumed. They described the feeling of their daily lives as being more “jangly” and “jarring” with “less room to breathe”.

Everyone agreed it was smart for Rovio to garner so many merchandise deals and product placements for their Angry Birds franchise, including a movie with a matching branded game edition  – Rio. They also thought product placements in stores like Target that encouraged participation, like the Hulk footprints, were a whimsical and fun way to get a marketing message across, providing they didn’t cross that line from fun to jarring and intrusive. Crossing that line erodes trust. That erosion of trust was a huge topic (and will be it’s own blog post, this one is just about the fun you can have with creative marketing).

(Apropos of nothing, it also amused me to see Awkward Family Photos is now a video game)

 

What are some of your favorite product placement campaigns that you’ve seen lately? I think the marketing around the Avengers has been my favorite recently, but then, I am partial to super heroes. What’s encouraged you to play?

 

The Reports of Facebook’s Death Are Greatly Exaggerated

Please believe me when I say that I fervently wish reports of Facebook’s pending doom like this one were true. I just can’t agree, however. I think it is the wishful thinking of a tech press, sour investors and tech savvy professionals that don’t like the platform, and that it doesn’t take into account some key factors.

The most significant factor this prediction ignores is the human element. I agree that Facebook is evil and manhandles our privacy on a regular basis. I’d love to see people stand up and fight to prevent the significant changes the careless use of Facebook on a regular basis has made to our individual concept of accepted privacy vs publicy and how those changes are (negatively) impacting our society. The chances of that happening are slim to none, however, no matter how hard people like myself advocate for vigilantly guarding your right to privacy.

Completely ignoring the added issues of Facebook’s impact on how we think, our workday and our offline relationships, we can’t ignore one thing Facebook has mastered: it’s users behavior and emotional need to connect. Facebook has inserted itself into our lives in a way that MySpace and Yahoo simply never did. It’s crossed a barrier between generations that neither of those social networks were able to cross by finding a way to coexist across age limits, careers and demograhics. MySpace never really resonated with the parents or the grandparents in the way Facebook does – they got lost in the glare and blare and glitter. Yahoo never really resonated with kids past a certain age the way it resonated with an older demographic. Facebook manages to straddle the line.

The second factor that the article ignores is iteration. Many would choose the over-used term innovation here, but that’s not accurate. There is not a lot in the way of true innovation going on in tech right now. However, the company that can spot trends and iterate fastest across the most demographic touchpoints will win, and for the foreseeable future, like it or not, that company looks like it’s going to be Facebook.  The only way I see Facebook being completely gone by 2020 is if the internet (or the concept of a nextnet, whatever this space becomes over time) is itself gone. As long as we can connect, Facebook has shown a willingness (and budget) to iterate itself into our lives continuously.

Some say marketing will be what kills Facebook over time, but I disagree there also. Facebook has made it quite difficult for the average marketer of the average company to see success on their platform, and that is very intentional. They want to straddle the line of paying the bills and keeping the user enthralled, and you can’t do that as a company if you let marketing run the show (see this piece on GM for one example). Companies that play well in the pool, like Ford, see success, but others struggle, unable to see beyond traditional, limited marketing rhetoric. This ability to force marketing to act on the sidelines and to put the users into the marketing stream via stories is a third thing that will keep Facebook relevant far longer than most expect.

The fourth and final key element to the longevity of Facebook is their New York Yankees style growth plan. If they can make it, they do, and if they can’t make it, they buy it (disclaimer: Red Sox Fan). There is a lot of talent out there toiling away at various startups or under the umbrella of stodgier existing companies that will have plenty of ideas and technologies for sale to keep Facebook strong for years to come. Jut because some pundits think that’s a lazy approach, or some purists think you should create these things for yourself, doesn’t mean that buying talent or tools doesn’t work. So far it seems to be working far better for Facebook than it does for Google, a company who tends to ignore or kill the majority of the cool tech it buys.

How do you come down on this argument? Do think the projections of Facebook’s demise are greatly exaggerated or correct, and why?

 

SMM4D Virtual Book Tour Kicks Off June 20 – Join Us!

ONLINE 6:00 PM Eastern/ 3:00 PM Pacific – Join us!

—–> REGISTER HERE

I am pleased to announce that I will be hosting a live book talk on Shindig, a new customized video chat space for live events. We will be connected globally via webcam online, and can interact and participate in a live talk about Social Media Metrics. You can socialize with other participants, or watch and listen. The event will be June 20, 2012 at 6pm Eastern / 3 PM Pacific.

Here’s how it works. About 15 minutes before it starts go to the event link and log in (those who register using the link above will receive their log in instructions to their email). You should test your microphone and camera at this time. Then when the event starts we can get underway. We will have an interactive talk about Social Media Metrics, followed by a question and answer session. The talk is sponsored by Shindig Events.

The way to make this interesting and fun is to have A LOT of people in attendance. So please invite as many of your friends as you like to join us! Spread the word on Facebook and Twitter to as many people as you can.

Grab your web cams and get ready for a fun evening!

More Info Here

Get your copy of the book on Kindle or paperback before the event here!

Wrap Post: From Dummy to Genius Metrics Webinar with Awareness

Seminar on Metrics for Awareness

View more presentations from Leslie Poston

(Having trouble viewing the slides? Try this link.)

I had the pleasure of presenting a webinar on social media metrics for a group of people* via the Awareness Inc. webinar series this week. This is the second webinar I’ve done with Awareness and I enjoy it every time. The people who sign up are always engaged and ask fantastic questions.  I know there is a recording on Awareness, and you can grab it here.

I was asked to create a list of the tools I mentioned. I only touched the tip of the iceberg with tools listed and the potential of metrics in the webinar. An hour is so short when you’re discussing such an important and comprehensive topic! (By the way, Walter Schärer attended from pretty far away and took some fairly good notes, linked here for your reference. If you also took notes, let me know and I’ll link to your post.) Regarding tools, there are many, many more tools in the book, and instruction on how to create many of the metrics we discussed (available here), but here are those tools I was able to mention this week for you:

1) For more information on the reverse tracking of the metrics of Occupy Movement sites that I mentioned to illustrate my point that metrics is a two-way street, I refer you to Tim Lebert’s post detailing his findings

2) Awareness, Inc’s Hub

3) Google Analytics

4) KISSMetrics

5) Ripples (Google Plus)

6) SocialStatistics (Google Plus)

7) Bit.ly (Twitter, etc – URL shortener with stats)

8 ) Ow.ly (Twitter, etc – URL shortener with stats)

9) HootSuite(see above)

10) TweetReach (Twitter)

11) Page Lever  (Facebook)

12) Edgerank Checker (Facebook)

13) TubeMogul (Youtube – uploader with stats – now called OneLoad)

14) PinReach (Pinterest)

15) Pintics (Pinterest)

16) Pinerly (Pinterest)

17) Pinpuff (Pinterest)

18) MailChimp (Email)

19) Constant Contact (Email)

20) WhatCounts (Email)

21) Localytics (Mobile)

22) Google Alerts (Competitive Intelligence)

23) Search Alerts for Ebay (Competitive Intelligence)

24) Advanced Twitter Search (Competitive Intelligence)

25) Slick RSS (Competitive Intelligence – any RSS reader will do, pick your favorite)

26) ChangeDetection (Competitive Intelligence)

27) HowSociable (Competitive Intelligence)

28) SocialMention (Competitive Intelligence)

29) Majestic SEO (Competitive Intelligence)

30) SEO for Chrome (Competitive Intelligence)

31) W3 Patrol (Competitive Intelligence)

32) W3 Techs (Competitive Intelligence)

33) Regular Expression Checker (Competitive Intelligence)

34) GA Data Grabber from MTAnalytics

35) Christopher Penn (Great source of actionable info)

36) Avinash Kausik (Great source of info)

37) Radian6 (Metrics + Sentiment)

38) Custom Scoop (Metrics + Sentiment)

39) Quantified Self Movement (Metrics Outside of the Box)

40) Nicholas Felton (QS Example)

41) Fitbit (the device I use to track exercise, sleep, etc)

*And by “group of people” I mean well over 1000 signed up. Thank you so much, that was an honor.

I use Creative Commons Search to find awesome, available for use images for my slide shows. Credit for the images that made this slide show more awesome go to:

Marc_Smith, Adbusters, Seattle Municipal Archives, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Search Engine People, craigCloutier, Anonymous9000, klipfolio, mtanalytics, stockerre, filmnoir 1, Nicholas Felton

You Can Get Social Media Metrics for Dummies on Kindle Now!

You can grab a copy of Social Media Metrics for Dummies on your Kindle now (and elsewhere) – and I can even e-autograph it for you* – how neato is that?

I was not expecting the Kindle edition to be out until after the book drops on June 13, so I am very, very excited about this.

Lots of folks have been asking me about ebook availability, so this early release makes me happy.

I am told it will also be out in iBook format, etc. as well soon.

*There are no fees from me for the autograph, or from Amazon – unless you are a Kindle Personal document Service user – which means Amazon charges you a fee. That KPDF fee does not in any way go to me – it’s all Amazon.

I can e-sign Twitter for Dummies for you also, by the way. 😉

Social TV – Future TV – Has to Go Deeper

I’ve been thinking about social television and how slow the networks are to adapt to it for months. Then this week a spate of excellent shows being cancelled across networks (in spite of online fan interest) inspired me to try and compose my thoughts.

As an author and avid reader, many of my friends are frequently surprised at how much television I watch. I read, yes – I used to read a book each day but now it’s about three a week. I love the escape of the printed page (and no, I don’t have a Kindle. I get enough screen time for my eyes, the printed page is a great break.) I watch films, yes – some of my clients are in the film industry. But television has always captivated my attention.

A child of the 70s and 80s, the TV was my first babysitter (my Nana used to plop me in front of it in my playpen for hours. I’d watch Sesame Street, Electric Company, 3-2-1 Contact and Chico and the Man all the way until Young and the Restless and mom coming home). I used to sing my mom the commercials when she’d come to pick me up after work (an early career indicator? Perhaps). I knew I always wanted to write books, and loved reading books just as much – heck, I started reading when I was 3 – but TV has this way of connecting people, regardless of education or class, in a way even my favorite books simply don’t do. Anything that brings people closer together, that bridges the divides we place between “us” and “them”, captures my attention.

This means my thoughts have been focused on the sluggishness of the networks in catching up with the new “ratings” system of social media. To continue to depend  solely on the old-style Nielsen ratings with no regard to the second and third screens (phone and tablet) is simply short sighted. I don’t watch anything without checking in with my friends (friends from real life and the people inside the box) on apps like Get Glue, TV Dinner, Miso and Twitter now. Friends of mine like Meleah have viewing “parties” on their Facebook walls and Twitter accounts with hundreds of people commenting and chatting about the show they watch together – every week.

Some networks, like NBC, are certainly trying to be social now with their shows like The Voice, but they are still falling short. Throwing a screetching, thinspo hostess and a hashtag at your audience is certainly a good start (and more than many networks are doing right now), but it isn’t the complete answer. It’s still trying to control the conversation instead of listening to the feedback your audience is giving you in real time.

Take a look at The Finder, a recently cancelled show (one of many not given adequate time to gain Nielsen traction). It had a good audience of happy fans watching – on DVR. Delayed viewers are captured via online media, social networks and mobile apps – not traditional ratings. Being part of Social TV and making sure your industry remains relevant means getting past pandering to old traditions in media and thinking of the future of interactive, participatory television.

I imagine the proprietary nature of the delivery mechanisms of television are a key stumbling block to the growth of Future TV. If delivery systems like Comcast, DISHNetwork, Time Warner, etc won’t share their analytics about viewers watching via DVR, On Demand, etc.; if Netflix and Hulu hold the same data close to their vests; and the online viewing tools like Beyond TV find sharing a risk – how can television grow and prosper? Media can no longer thrive behind a wall of suits.

Television is finally facing the same dilemma music and film have faced for years – finding growth in a changing technological world. Television is best suited to adapt to the winds of change – it’s a medium that is inherently deeply personal, that reaches people in their homes, at their invitation. The interesting thing is that now this invitation is also on the viewer’s terms. I have lots of ideas about how television can adapt and thrive (hint, it’s going to take more than an updated design and user interface, though those are long overdue). It will be interesting to see how long they continue to fling old media tricks at a new media problem, however.

Stay tuned. I’ll be deep diving into some of the ways I think TV should grow up over the coming days in a series of posts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Metrics Tips: Google Analytics Apps Gallery

Google has a lot of hidden gems. Sometimes the best gems disappear (we really miss many toys found in Google Labs that have been deprecated, for example), but their Apps Gallery has staying power.

One of the tools I didn’t mention in the most recent book, Social Media Metrics for Dummies (available June 2012), is the Google Analytics Apps Gallery. This book is designed to teach you metrics fundamentals and get you started on your measurement journey, or to increase your skill set if you’ve been taking a DIY approach to metrics for a while. Once you’ve got some metrics under your belt, you might find some of the tools here helpful.

Even more important, however, is the ability to list your tool if you are an app maker building a tool around metrics.  That link takes you to the submission form to get your app listed in the Google Analytics App Gallery. From there, you want to try to get listed in Editor’s Picks – this is achieved by good reviews and good ratings of your app by users.