White Paper: How To Kick-Start Your Content Marketing

I contributed to this ebook/white paper on content marketing called How To Kick-Start Your Content Marketing, A Seven Step Approach to Delivering Success, created after a webinar I did with Mike Lewis of Awareness, Taulbee Jackson of Raidious and Paul Gillin. Enjoy, and thanks to Skyword for gathering our thoughts together for the book!

Download Here

How to Take Back Control of Facebook Privacy

At the request of many friends and family members, as well as folks on social networks I see struggling as Timeline on Facebook is rolled out to everyone, I made this quick video tutorial.

In under ten minutes it will help you regain control of your Facebook privacy, tame your news feed and silence noisy updates and ads. In the next video, we’ll cover even more in depth ways to be private on Facebook when not using Facebook at all isn’t an option for you.

HootSuite - Social Media Management

Talking Social Media Metrics on Breakthrough Business Radio

Yesterday I was on Breakthrough Business Radio.

If you missed it, here is the audio:

Listen to internet radio with Breakthroughbusiness on Blog Talk Radio

Michelle Price and Leslie Poston talk about Social Media Metrics

Social Media Metrics, from Novice to Expert

This week I did a webinar with Demand Metric on tips and tricks for advancing your metrics knowledge.

The entire video is embedded below.

Thanks so much to Jerry Rackley and team for having me. You had a great group with great questions!

Overview:

Getting from Novice to Expert

Marketers that understand the value of social media are nevertheless often unsure the best approach to monitoring and measuring their social media efforts. This free webinar, presented by Leslie Poston, author of “Social Media Metrics for Dummies” will help you sift through all the information available about social media monitoring and metrics so that you can know what’s being said and measure the effectiveness of your social media efforts.

Using principles from her book, Leslie will teach attendees of this webinar:

How you can feel like your efforts online are measurable and full of purpose and direction.
How applying metrics to the whole organization for a true social business model will help you drive sales and grow your brand.
How metrics should lead to more than one goal: marketing and brand awareness, sales, competitive intelligence, human resources, content marketing plans and more.

Buy the Social Media Metrics for Dummies book here for more like this. Have a copy already? Review it here.

The Next Generation of CRM: Social Media Today Webinar

This week, wearing my author hat for Social Media Metrics for Dummies and my strategy hat from M2, I had the pleasure of joining Mike Lewis, author of Stand Out Social Marketing: How to Rise Above the Noise, Differentiate Your Brand, and Build an Outstanding Online Presence and VP of Sales and Marketing for Awareness; Paul Gillin, author of Social Marketing to the Business Customer and B2B marketing coach; Taulbee Jackson, Chief Strategist at Raidius; and the folks at Social Media Today for a webinar on The Next Generation of CRM.

It was an information packed hour moderated by the capable and well-informed Brent Leary where we covered all that’s new and worth noting in CRM, made a few predictions, had some witty banter and generally enjoyed talking shop and doing our best to be helpful for everyone tuned in.

If you missed it, you can download or listen to the audio with Leslie Poston, Paul Gillin, Mike Lewis, Taulbee Jackson, Brent Leary, Robin Carey for Next Generation of CRM by Social Media Today and see the simple slide deck below in this post.

A bit of the Twitter conversation during the webinar:

 

 

 

 

Read on for more event tweets and quotes and the full official webinar wrap description from the Social Media today wrap post:

 

The Social Web has removed a lot of the stability, structure and control that once characterized CRM. Traditional CRM has featured elements of communication and feedback tracking, but they have always relied on structured tools for participation and recording actions and outcomes. Now, customer relations exist across a wide assortment of platforms and conversations where the business must radically adapt if it is to practice any kind of management. In this webinar, our panelists will assess the new CRM – its potential and its limits in the context of a customer-defined playing field. Tune in and bring your questions as we explore the following issues:

Where does CRM live in a socially savvy business?
What CRM tools and practices have become outmoded and how are they being replaced?
Are there any boundaries between CRM, marketing, PR and CS on the Social Web?
How has the customer’s role changed in the relationship?
About the Panel:

Mike Lewis, VP of Sales and Marketing at Awareness, Inc. and author of Stand Out Social Marketing

Leslie Poston, Founder of Magnitude Media, Speaker, author of Social Media Metrics for Dummies, Brand Journalist for Radian 6.

Paul Gillin, Trainer and B2B social media marketing coach, author of three books on social media marketing including his most recent book Social Marketing to the Business Customer.

Brent Leary, is a CRM industry analyst, advisor, author, speaker and award winning blogger. He is co-founder and Partner of CRM Essentials LLC

Taulbee Jackson, is the founder and CEO of Raidious, the company that managed the social media efforts for the 2012 Super Bowl.

 

 

 

Throwing Stones at Glass Houses, or Privacy vs Publicy

Normally I am all business on this blog, but let’s take a moment to think about a few tech issues on a personal level. I think Google Glass is cool tech – I love cool tech – but if I see someone wearing Google Glass glasses after they come out, I’m infinitely less likely to want to be anywhere near them for any type of interaction. As the glasses get better and harder to detect, I’m likely to learn people have them by experience then avoid them. I’m wondering if I’m the only one?

You see, in spite of my public job, I don’t assume that every moment, thought or deed (my own or others’) needs to be public.  I am not a fan of being photographed or having video taken without being asked first, or having photos put up I don’t get a chance to look at first, and if you have ever tagged me in a non-work related photo – well, you already know how I feel about that. I value privacy and the dwindling ability to choose how much the internet at large gets to see of my (actual) life.  Just because you *can* take a picture of someone in a public place doesn’t mean you *should*.

People ask me why Facebook is my least favorite social network. Setting aside the network’s blatant disregard for a consistent user experience, the manipulation of the user base while on site and the downright Machiavellian terms of service: the total disregard for privacy on the network, and the inconsiderate behavior it encourages in people, really make me cringe. I feel we must do our best to resist a world where we have spy glasses, drone planes, a culture of eavesdropping on communications and an “always on” mentality.

Let’s look at it from the simple perspective of crime, if you don’t like the privacy angle. As a woman, I am cautious to only pre-disclose events I plan to attend if I know my home will have someone in it and that the event will keep me surrounded by people. I don’t connect with many people on sites like Foursquare – I use them to keep me motivated for things like the gym, but never check into my home, and more often than not I keep my check ins private unless I am – you guessed it – surrounded by people and know my home is protected while I’m gone.  I value time with my friends where I can let my hair down a bit and have a little fun, and I eschew anyone who tries to make those vital moments of being out of the public eye public by sticking a camera phone or flip cam in my face.

It’s because that behavior is rude and invasive, true, but  it’s also because it’s not wise. I can’t control the privacy settings of other people – I can only control my own. A large percentage of information bleed online comes from the missed settings and carelessness of other people that you know. You can lock your own privacy settings down tight, but your inebriated friend at the reception might have his set to public, or a relative might not be as tech savvy, and enough unwarranted photos might reveal you or your kids’ favorite hangout, even if you try to keep it private, which could put you and people you know at risk.

I get a lot of flack from photographer friends about my desire to be asked before photographed. They err on the side of “if you’re in a public place, your consent is automatic”. I agree that at times that’s true. I can’t really get annoyed if I’m speaking at a conference and my picture or a video is taken, and I don’t – it’s all about context.  There is a difference between being in a “public place” and “publicy” and a need in this hyperconnected age to be vigilant and respectful about not just your own privacy but the privacy of those you come in contact with.

Mass adoption of new technology always causes a cultural shift. As one example: the dissolution of public transportation and rise of the car brought us the suburbs and contributed to urban decay in addition to making it possible to do cool things like go visit relatives in Ireland or go on vacation quickly and easily (the car and the plane brought us the world, but the trade offs for easy access to the planet have been pretty significant).

I wonder if we are prepared for – or even cognizant of – the cultural shift away from privacy that is in process right now and what it will cost us if not handled delicately and reigned in to allow for private spaces inside and out. Study after study  shows that privacy, the ability to reinvent oneself or move past a prior mistake in life (Think for a moment of Facebook’s recent indication that they will open up to ages 13 and under and what that will mean to their ability to grow from bad decisions, learn and reinvent when it’s time to move into their adult life. Pretty serious impact, isn’t it? ), the chance for quiet solitude and reflection to grow creativity and deepen thought processes, the ability to move safely from one place to another and more are vital to our well being as individuals and as a society.

*Note: the issue of trading our online behavioral and shopping data for access to sites is a whole ‘nother issue/can of worms. Post on that coming soon.

What are your thoughts on privacy vs publicy and this huge cultural shift that is going on under our noses?

PodCamp Boston, PodCamp NH and PodCamp Philly Come Together For PodCamp East 2012

We decided to take a year and do an experiment to answer the question: what would happen if three of the thriving PodCamps came together as one for 2012? The answer: PodCamp EAST 2012.

About PodCamp East:

“Once upon a time, there was a little event that two guys started in Boston. Named after BarCamp, they called it PodCamp and expected 50 people to show up. Instead 300 people came and started a movement. Today, PodCamps have occurred on every continent except Antarctica and have helped thousands of people around the world learn, share, and grow their new media skills.

This year, the organizers of PodCamps Boston, NH, and Philly are trying something new: PodCamp East. We recognize that times call for a little more thrifty approach to attending conferences, so rather than litter the East Coast with lots of events, we’re bringing together 3 PodCamps into one.

Come join us on September 28, 2012 and learn, share, and grow your new media skills at PodCamp East!”

Will There Ever Be Another PodCamp NH?

YES, PodCamp NH is not dead. PodCamp East is an experiment this year to see what happens when you consolidate great minds into one event around a central theme at a location everyone can drive, fly, bus, walk or take a train to instead of having scattered events.

Can we sponsor, speak, register to attend, volunteer or otherwise get involved with PodCamp East?

YES. There are links to all of the above at the PodCamp East site, and Leslie Poston, PodCamp NH founder, is already committed to speaking as well.

We’ll be posting PodCamp East news here as it develops – there is a lot of exciting news about it to tell you all. Stay tuned here and on the PodCamp East site.

Save The Date for PodCamp EAST

We’ll be able to talk more about the exciting experiment we’re trying with some of your favorite PodCamps soon, but for now….

Save The Date! PodCamp EAST is coming on Sept 29 & 30, 2012 – More exciting details coming soon, we promise!

Social Business vs Responsive Business

The term social business is in the air today, and there seems to be some general confusion about what the term means. As I keep seeing it used, I think people who are saying “social business” actually mean “responsive business”. I’ll try and break down what I see as the different aspects of each:

Responsive Business

This business is savvy in social networks and engagement. It’s got a channel open on every social corner, and has listening for brand mentions and customer concerns and responding quickly down pat. It is strong in brand awareness and customer service on social channels. Lead generation, thought leadership and business growth are happy side effects of a consistent social media, email and content marketing strategy supported by basic analytics and metrics analysis.

Social Business

The true social business uses social tools, metrics and methods internally and externally to be a better overall business across departments. In addition to using outward facing social media platforms and tools in expected ways: to increase sales and sales leads and bring information from networks into the process, to build brand awareness and establish thought leadership, to market to customers and potential partners, to source new employees and gather information about applicants, for competitive intelligence, for product marketing and research, informal crowdsourcing, data mining, information distribution, affiliate and referral sales and other established practices, the social business has an internally social component. The inward facing social ideal breaks down silos between departments, making internal communication fluid and complete, ensuring that the company operates more efficiently. It relays information faster and more accurately and makes all employees at all levels part of the process of a smoothly run business. It empowers people to make better decisions in the departments by connecting them to the information and people they need to access efficiently. In short, a social business uses social tools and social ideals to create a well oiled machine with agile business practices that help them grow and become competitive as markets shift and change quickly. This is a holistic shift in how business is done that is different than being on social media and responsive in that space.

What do you think? Are there differences I missed? Do you agree that the term social business as it is often used today is on its way to becoming as meaningless as the overused term “innovative” (often used when “iterative” makes more sense)?

Fun Product Placement Marketing

Walking through Target the other day, I started seeing giant “Hulk footprints” as I got closer to the back of the store.  I knew they’d lead me to the toy section, and to an Avengers merchandise display, but I followed them anyway. Why? Because it’s just as fun for grownups to Hulk-stomp their way through a store as it is for kids.

When I brought it up at dinner that night, my friends were mixed. Many have kids, so they are largely against the glitz and glamour that encourages their kids to whine and beg for yet more toys, when they don’t play with the ones they have. And don’t get them started on toys branded as collectibles – that brings up stories of the Beanie Babies craze in the 80s and 90s and how spectacularly low in value those toys are now (one person even did a stint as a Beanie Baby show bouncer – the moms and grandmas would physically fight over the toys).

The conversation segued into movie product placements, and into movies that seem entirely sponsored by one entity, regardless of if that’s true or not (think You’ve Got Mail with Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks). This group of people, none of whom are marketers, have become jaded by so much advertising being inserted directly into their lives. They miss the days when advertising and marketing seemed more apart from the tools they used, the places the visited and the media they consumed. They described the feeling of their daily lives as being more “jangly” and “jarring” with “less room to breathe”.

Everyone agreed it was smart for Rovio to garner so many merchandise deals and product placements for their Angry Birds franchise, including a movie with a matching branded game edition  – Rio. They also thought product placements in stores like Target that encouraged participation, like the Hulk footprints, were a whimsical and fun way to get a marketing message across, providing they didn’t cross that line from fun to jarring and intrusive. Crossing that line erodes trust. That erosion of trust was a huge topic (and will be it’s own blog post, this one is just about the fun you can have with creative marketing).

(Apropos of nothing, it also amused me to see Awkward Family Photos is now a video game)

 

What are some of your favorite product placement campaigns that you’ve seen lately? I think the marketing around the Avengers has been my favorite recently, but then, I am partial to super heroes. What’s encouraged you to play?